FAQs

What is Arts Cleveland?

Arts Cleveland is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization dedicated to advancing the arts and culture community in Cleveland and Cuyahoga County. We are an advocate, ally and ambassador for and with the arts and culture community. We were formerly known as the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture (CPAC)

Where is Arts Cleveland, and where does it offer services?

Much of Arts Cleveland’s work takes place online and in conversations with people from all over Cuyahoga County. Our office is located in the Tower Press building facing Superior Avenue and East 21st Street. Arts Cleveland also collaborates with other organizations, counties and communities in the region to host events and address arts and culture concerns relating to our research, advocacy, connections and strategy.

Does Arts Cleveland offer art classes?

No. We don’t participate directly in the creation of arts and culture programs. However, we can help direct you to organizations that provide them.

Is Arts Cleveland a government agency?

No. Arts Cleveland is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization. However, we often cooperate with government agencies to assist them in the development of their arts and cultural assets.

Does Arts Cleveland provide funding to artists?

Not currently. The Creative Workforce Fellowship program concluded at the end of 2016, and project grants through the Artists in Residence program ended in 2013.

Does Arts Cleveland provide funding to arts and cultural organizations?

No. While Arts Cleveland has periodically been engaged to assist municipalities with their arts and culture grants programs, we don’t typically provide funds to arts and cultural organizations. The best resource for identifying funding opportunities for arts and culture programs is Candid. Additionally, Cuyahoga Arts & Culture offers general operating and project grants to nonprofits within Cuyahoga County.

What is Cuyahoga Arts & Culture and what does it do?

Cuyahoga Arts & Culture (CAC) is a political subdivision of the State of Ohio and one of the largest local public-sector funders of arts and culture in the country. It manages the distribution of funds generated from a tax on cigarettes in Cuyahoga County. More information is available at their website, cacgrants.org. One of our jobs is to advocate for continued support of these and other public funds for arts and culture.

Do you have a graphic of how Arts Cleveland relates to other organizations to advocate for public funding?

How can I get involved?

Sign up for our email newsletter and be among the first in the region to hear about opportunities, events, partnerships and changes in policy that affect the arts and culture sector. Explore training opportunities, networking events and other public forums on our calendar to become a part of the arts and culture movement. Consider a donation to support our work as an advocate, ally and ambassador or become a sponsor of the annual Public Officials Recognition Breakfast.

How is arts and culture relevant to me?

The term “arts and culture” is broad, but almost everyone has encountered art or culture, maybe without even realizing it. Have you visited one of the museums in University Circle or downtown? Do you know a child who’s performed in a play or choir? Do you know an artist, a musician, a writer or a filmmaker? Have you participated in a music therapy program or seen a sculpture installation in a park or on the side of the street? All of these activities are examples of “arts and culture,” and they’re a critical part of our regional identity.

In an even broader sense, arts and culture is a tremendous economic engine for our region, creating jobs and generating tax dollars. It can breathe new life into neighborhoods. It can generate business networks and bring in new businesses. It helps drive tourism. It provides students with creative expression, and gives them a new and more tangible understanding of math, science and history. All of this is possible only with a strong base of arts and culture assets.